Oliver Stone's Alexander (2004) on the Hellenistic Age Podcast

Hey everyone! My first collaborative episode is up! I spent some time chatting with Derek of the Hellenistic Age podcast about Oliver Stone’s Alexander (2004 and all the subsequent re-releases). You can check that out on the Hellenistic Age podcast feed (links below)! .

iTunes
https://itunes.apple.com/us/podcast/the-hellenistic-age-podcast/id1377920930?mt=2

Spotify
https://open.spotify.com/show/3OVlqzoNg4KW987igfhskd

Stitcher
http://www.stitcher.com/s?fid=225541&refid=stpr

RSS
http://feeds.soundcloud.com/users/soundcloud:users:439067766/sounds.rss

Episode 27: The Grand Tour, Part 2

Administrative Divisions of the Achaemenid Empire, 490 BC by Ian Mladjov on Ian Mladjov’s Resources

The tour of the Persian Empire continues, this time covering the western Satrapies. I’m exploring the details and histories of the Persian provinces starting with Armenia and moving counter clockwise, through Anatolia and Europe, over the Mediterranean, North Africa, Arabia, and Assyria. Based on the maps of Ian Mladjov.
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Holiday Special 2019

Tribute bearers bringing the foods and goods of the world to the Great King. Bas relief at Persepolis

Happy Holidays Everyone! In place of a regular episode this week, we have the first annual History of Persia Holiday Special. Regardless of what holidays you’re celebrating, or not, I have a surprise topic to cover by audience request this week. Please enjoy!
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Interesting topic? Check out Anthrochef’s History of Food.

Episode 24: Darius the Great

From The History of Darius the Great by Jacob Abbott, 1904

With most of the Persian Empire firmly under his control in 519 BCE, Darius the Great set off to earn that title by conquering surrounding territories and spreading Achaemenid territory to its greatest ever extent. He pushed the boundaries of the known world and established an empire that stretched that spanned nearly 4,000 miles from North Africa to the Indus River Valley.
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Episode 18: The Tyrant and The Kings

Polykrates by Mikhail I. Kozlovsky, 1790 in bronze, in the Russian Museum. The piece depicts the crucifixion of the tyrant. From Stebanoid via Wikimedia Commons under Creative Commons Attribution-Share Alike 3.0 Unported

The story of Polykrates, the Tyrant of Samos, intersects repeatedly with the history of the Persian empire during his life. From his rise to power in the vacuum left when Miletus was conquered, to his alliance with Egypt against the Persians, and finally to his death on the orders of a Satrap. His story feeds directly into the history around Oroites, the Satrap of Sparda (the kingdom formerly known as Lydia). Oroites tried to seize some power for himself in events that prepare our narrative for the chaotic years following Cambyses’ death.
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Episode 6: Introducing Ionia

A map of the Ancient Greek world: the mainland, Peloponnese, Aegean islands, and Ionian coast. Original by MaryroseB54, Wikimedia Commons via Creative Commons Attribution-Share Alike 4.0 International license. Alterations from linked file by Trevor Culley, 2019.

Cyrus’s generals take the reins for a bit and the Persian conquerors face their most grueling task yet: subduing the Ionian Greek city states. Persia’s first interaction with the Greek speaking world was a drawn out, and possibly brutal conquest of the western coasts of Anatolia, but when they were done the empire was larger, more secure, and ready to keep pushing its boundaries south into the wealthy territory of Babylon. 
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