Episode 23: The Lyin’ Kings

The major figures of the Behistun Inscription, from left to right: The Noblemen; Gobryas and Intaphrenes. The King; Darius. The Rebels; Gaumata (beneath Darius), Assina, Nidintu-Bel, Fravartish, Martiya, Ciçataxma, Vahyazdata, Arakha, Frada, and Skunkha.

Picking right back up in the late summer of 521 BCE, I’m talking about the rest of the rebellions against Darius. That’s the last three campaigns against the Liar Kings from the Behistun Inscription, the strangely absent rebellion in Egypt, and the other rebels that were excluded from the famous monument before concluding with personal betrayal for the new King of Kings.
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Episode 22: Putting Out Fires

A map of Darius’s wars with the Liar Kings with identifiable locations marked

No sooner was Bardiya dead, than the newly minted King Darius had to turn his attention on rebellious subjects. One satrapy after the next went into revolt at the end of 522 BCE, and Darius spent most of his first year on the throne directing his armies from place to place to try and hold the empire together. This time, I’m talking about Darius, the calendar, and the rebellious liar kings who sundered the Persian Empire. 
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Episode 10: Governing An Empire

King Cyrus (front) with future Satrap Harpagus (back) as depicted in the 18th Century Tapestry: The Defeat of Astyages. Designed by Maximilien de Haese, Woven by Jac. van der Borght (1771-1775). Currently housed in the Museum of Fine Arts, Boston.

What exactly is a Satrap? Is there such a thing as a Satrapy? How did all of these people manage to talk to one another? All this, and more as the History of Persia celebrates double-digits with a break down of how the Persian Empire was actually organized and managed during the Teispid Period.

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Episode 9: Who Are You Again?

Gallery of art and architecture described in the episode, click on a picture to see it full size. Left to right: Palace S at Pasargadae, the Seal of Cyrus I sketched, side by side Gate R today and restored sketch. Bottom: Tomb of Cyrus the Great. Captions posted as a comment on each image All images from Wikimedia Commons via Creative Commons Attribution-ShareAlike 3.0 License.

This time we’re taking a break from the narrative for a bit. Now that this show has all of Cyrus’s major conquests under its belt, its probably worth getting a sense of what these Persians were actually like. This episode covers art, architecture, clothing, and the major cultural influences of the early Persian period, under the Teispid kings. Let’s see what the world around Cyrus the Great might have looked like.

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Episode 8: Fill in the Titles

The Cyrus Cylinder, currently housed at the British Museum, London. Photo credit: Emily Culley, 2017.

Cyrus the Great has finally completed his conquests in our narrative. I break down the Cyrus Cylinder, the official record of what he did next, one section at a time. In this episode, I shamelessly take advantage of current events and link Persian history to both Easter and Game of Thrones. Listen and explorer official Persian propaganda, an expanding royal family, the historic and religious legacy of Cyrus, and all the titles of the Persian King. 
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Cyrus the Great: Life and Lore
Cylinder Translation


Episode 7: The Writing on the Wall


The Neo-Babylonian Empire at the time of Cyrus’s Conquest with the locations of major battles. The original labels are French, but hopefully similar enough to figure out. Original by Zunkir, Wikimedia Commons via GNU Free Documentation License, Version 1.2. Alterations by Trevor Culley, 2019.

In Babylon, October of 539 BCE began in the 17th year of the reign of Nabonidus, but it ended in the 1st year of Cyrus. In this episode Cyrus the Great carries out his final campaign against Babylon. Our sources tell us that after a few short battles, the greatest city of the ancient world through open its gates and the Persians won the day. Of course, ancient history is never quite that clean. This time, we explore Cyrus’s greatest conquest, and the troubled, but fascinating, reign of Babylon’s last king.
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Family Tree Online Now!

I just set up the instructions to download an Achaemenid family tree from the Family Tree tab above. It was brought to my attention that things might have gotten a little confusing with all of the intermarrying names. Hopefully this helps clarify things. For now the tree is a read-only HTML file that you need to download from Dropbox. In the future, I hope to set it up as another web page all on its own, but for now I’m limited in what I can do on WordPress. Feedback, as always, is very much appreciated.

Dropbox Link 3/7/2019